America should be thankful government isn’t a business
New York City street with flags

America should be thankful government isn’t a business

Posted April 24, 2017 09:53 AM by Jen Kuznicki New York City street with flags
robert cicchetti | Shutterstock
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In defense of getting things done in Washington, D.C., some pundits say the American people are exasperated because of the way D.C. bickers too much, and some have been repeating the claim that if the current government were a business, the business would have no hope of growth and perhaps go bankrupt. They claim that since Trump is a businessman who has the ability to “get things done,” in order for him to succeed, the government needs to be run like a business instead of the failed way it is now. They use the analogy as a lament and to perhaps take some of the blame off of the president, as it appears he has not been able to accomplish some of the great expectations of his “outsider” image in his first 100 days.

While it’s true that the business would indeed be bankrupt — the United States holds one and a half times more debt than the top 100 American companies combined, while taking in half their revenue, according to CNBC — the pundits make a huge error in worrying about growth. 

In business, growth is good, but growth in government ruins the private sector.

Both Democrats and liberal Republicans tend to love private/public partnerships where they are able to favor some companies at the expense of taxpayers and destroy competition. The companies who benefit love it too, even though it kills off entrepreneurialism, but I guess nobody cares about that now. I guess the mantra is, jobs, jobs, jobs, not start a business, start a business, start a business.

And as a patriotic lover of this nation, I think I’ve had enough of the consistent complaint by pundits and those hostile to our system of government that somehow life is better when everyone in Congress agrees. The argument has been used by liberal Republicans to brow-beat lovers of freedom into accepting the breakup of our culture and our nation’s fabric. The argument has been used by Democrats as well, and neither the Democrats nor the liberal Republicans work to inform constituents that the job of a political representative here in America is to preserve the liberty of all Americans. They don’t ever mention it because though they took an oath on the Bible to support and defend the Constitution, it’s just easier to promise goodies in order to stay in office. 

Too many Trump loyalists make a mistake in believing a president can do anything he wants without Congress, probably bolstered by the fact that Obama basically did. But to compare the government to a business is simply asinine. Our system of government has the president occupying an entirely different branch of government from Congress. That way, our representatives can’t be given top-down orders from a CEO-like figure causing yes-men to fall in line. Only in America does it work the other way around.

And no, the people aren’t customers of government. One of my representatives in Lansing used to say that the constituents really appreciate the customer service he and his team were able to provide. It made me livid, because he cast himself as a representative of the government rather than a representative of me. He acted like a traveling salesman, making his way through the district promising anyone with a complaint that he would bring it up in the next session. The people who complained that government was too big were called lunatics, because he was a representative of that big government. And he was a Republican, and that’s what Michigan Republicans wanted. And what the people want, the traveling salesman of BigGov would get for them!

It just goes to prove that the core of the argument that government should be treated like a business is truly an argument from the Left. Ironically, the far-left Democrat Party has been arguing against corporations and profits for decades, yet they treat government as the greatest business on the planet with unlimited profits because there are money-printing machines.

Trump isn’t the CEO of the nation, you and I don’t take orders from him, and everyone should be thankful for that. People should be thankful if their representatives are actually trying to support and defend the Constitution of the United States as they swore they would upon taking office, because only then can we be free. But people are woefully uninformed about why it is so important to slash the size of government and to uphold the separation of powers, and that is what makes this particular time so hard to take. When Republicans are in charge of both the White House and Congress, yet only a handful are actually supporting and defending the Constitution, working on principles that actually made this nation great to begin with, and that small group is getting all the scorn, the enthusiasm factor drains and the only “winning” happening is by the status quo.

Jen Kuznicki is a contributor to Conservative Review, a blue-collar wife and mom, a political writer, humorist, and conservative activist, a seamstress by trade, and compelled to write. Follow her on Twitter @JenKuznicki.