Rep. Gohmert takes on Dems’ Comey Shakespearean theater
happy sad masks on velvet

Rep. Gohmert takes on Dems’ Comey Shakespearean theater

Posted May 11, 2017 10:57 AM by Nate Madden happy sad masks on velvet
sadeugra | Getty Images
    • Font Size
    • A
    • A
    • A


Normally, when a bipartisanly disliked and distrusted public administrator is removed from office, one would imagine that there would be some semblance of consensus – or, at least, consistency in how the news would fall.

However, we find ourselves in the midst of the Trump administration, and consensus and consistency – even on political no-brainers – must always bring outrage from the opposition.

Congressman Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, joined the ranks of those calling out the pointless and hypocritical posturing surrounding James Comey’s dismissal as FBI director, tackling trumped-up hysteria with succinct Shakespearean allusion.

In an exclusive statement to Conservative Review Thursday, the Texas congressman points out the sheer hypocrisy of public officials who, right up until Comey got the pink slip, publicly paralleled their partisan rivals in criticizing the now-deposed bureau chief.

"Since many Democrats and media personnel made statements of outrage against Comey before he was fired and are now painting him as a paragon of virtue after his firing,” reads the emailed statement, “we are left in a quandary to discern which time they were lying and which time they were truthful.”

Indeed, rather than address the multiple times in which so many public officials on both sides stated that Comey had betrayed the public’s trust in how he ran the FBI, Democrats have held true to the maxim to never waste a good crisis and have turned the former director’s pink slip – as I pointed out yesterday – into a fully fabricated “constitutional crisis.”

“I choose to think they were truthful when they were excoriating Comey,” Rep. Gohmert states. “Therefore, the attacks on President Trump by Democrats now, including those in the media, for firing Comey are purely political theater ‘full of sound and fury, signifying nothing’” (borrowing from Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”).

Editor’s note: The piece has been updated to properly cite “Macbeth” as the Shakespearean play.

Nate Madden is a staff writer for Conservative Review, focusing on religious freedom, immigration, and the judiciary. Follow him @NateMaddenCR and on Facebook.