REPORT: Beltway-clinger Orrin Hatch to retire. Romney to run for Senate?
Orrin Hatch and Mitt Romney

REPORT: Orrin Hatch to retire. Romney to run for Senate?

Mitt Romney is the establishment frontrunner for Hatch’s seat, and he’s been meeting with Mitch McConnell.

Posted October 27, 2017 02:27 PM by Chris Pandolfo Orrin Hatch and Mitt Romney
Colin E. Braley | AP Photo
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Senator Orrin Hatch, R-Utah has reportedly told friends and allies in his home state that he will retire at the end of his term next year, and that former governor and presidential candidate Mitt Romney will run for his seat.

Five anonymous sources with knowledge of Hatch and Romney’s thinking spoke to the Atlantic, revealing that the timing of the official announcements has not yet been finalized. The Atlantic previously reported that Romney, the 2012 Republican nominee for president, was exploring a senate bid with advisers, friends, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.  

Senator Hatch’s retirement would be welcome by conservatives. In 2012, he promised that this would be his last term in the United States Senate. His voting record in this last term has been disastrous, having voted to fund Obamacare, to give amnesty to illegal aliens in the Gang of 8 bill, and to raise the debt ceiling repeatedly as Congress spends the country into oblivion.

A spokesman for Hatch disputed the report of his retirement.

“Nothing has changed since The Atlantic published a carbon copy of this same story in April, likely with the same anonymous sources who were no more informed on the Senator's thinking than they seem to be now,” said Dave Hansen. “Senator Hatch is focused on leading the Senate's efforts to pass historic tax reform, confirming strong judges to courts around the country, and continuing to fight through the gridlock to deliver results for Utah. He has not made a final decision about whether or not to seek reelection, but plans to by the end of the year.” 

Now 83 years old, Hatch would be pushing 90 at the end of his next term, should he decide to run and win reelection in 2018. But if he retires, Mitt Romney is the clear favorite of the establishment and the big-money donors to replace him.


 

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Chris Pandolfo is a staff writer and type-shouter for Conservative Review. He holds a B.A. in politics and economics from Hillsdale College. His interests are conservative political philosophy, the American founding, and progressive rock. Follow him on Twitter for doom-saying and great album recommendations @ChrisCPandolfo.