19 of 22 indicted for ultra-violent MS-13 murders are illegal aliens from Central America

· July 17, 2019  
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MS-13 tattooed hands
Oscar Rivera/AFP | Getty Images

When James Madison said the jobs of the federal government were “few and defined,” applied “principally on external objects,” he was referring to exactly what has been brought into California from Central America. Yesterday, in what should be the biggest new story of the day, California and federal law enforcement wrapped up an MS-13 task force investigation, completing the indictment of 22 MS-13 members from a particularly brutal cell responsible for numerous gruesome murders. The operation began last year with the arrest of 18 members of MS-13’s “Fulton clique,” culminating with the arrest of the final four in recent days, according to the 78-page indictment.

Some of the 22 were charged with killing four people in the Angeles National Forest, one in the Malibu hills, and a homeless man in North Hollywood over the past two years. The victims were beaten to death in the worst way imaginable by a gang culture we have now imported with illegal immigration. According to the U.S. attorney’s office, 19 of the 22 members came here illegally over the past few years from El Salvador and Honduras.

Thus, when you see “children” at the border being resettled into this country, just remember that a large number of them are gang members or vulnerable to joining violent gangs. As U.S. attorney Nick Hanna is quoted in the Los Angeles Times, “We’re seeing an influx of younger gang members coming into the area associating themselves with the Fulton clique who are extremely violent, who have to commit murders to join the clique.”

Claude Arnold, who once ran the Los Angeles field office of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), was quoted as saying, “These are newer entrants, so they’re making their bones with the gang, it’s just how it is. They want to make a name for themselves, and those are the people who are generally the most violent members of street gangs.”

According to the indictment, these people were “required to kill an MS-13 rival or someone perceived to be adverse to MS-13 to be initiated into MS-13.”

Remember when now-acting Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Commissioner Mark Morgan said that when he looked at many of these Central American teens when touring detention facilities as Border Patrol Chief, he saw future gang members? He made those comments to CR first in March and then in testimony before the Senate Homeland Security Committee in April. The media went crazy over them, calling him a racist. But he’s correct. Indeed, as Thomas Homan said, “a gang operation in NY last year entitled Operation Matador, which targeted MS-13 gang members, showed that approximately 40 percent of those arrested illegally entered the U.S. as part of a family unit or as a UAC. Many that entered the U.S. were already gang members or soon became gang members after arriving in the U.S.”

Paul Delacourt, the assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles field office, described the murders as “medieval-style.” One victim was “dismembered, and his body parts were thrown into a canyon after one of the defendants allegedly cut the heart out of the victim’s body,” according to DOJ. This is the price the American people have to pay when our government ignores our laws mandating the denial of entry to people like this.

The 22 defendants are: German Hernandez, Angel Guzman, Ever Morales, Fernando Parada, Jose Baquiax Alvarez, Kevin Gomez, Kevin Arteaga, Edgar Velasquez, Walter Chavez Larin, Yefri Revelo, Wilfredo Vides, Gerardo Alvarado, Roberto Carlos Mendez Cruz, Bryan Alberto Ordones, Roberto Alejandro Corado Ortiz, Edwin Issac Mendez, Josue Balmore Flores Castro, Luis Arturo Gonzalez, Edwin Martinez, Steven Emmanuel Linares, Marco Antonio Ramos, and Erick Eduardo Rosales Arias.

While most of the victims were rival gang members who were here illegally, the homeless man was killed for merely being in a park “controlled” by the gang. Others murdered were “perceived to be cooperating with law enforcement,” according to the Justice Department.

One other point is in order: There is a bipartisan movement suggesting that too many people sit in federal prison for too long on bogus or low-level charges. What I have proven many times throughout the debate on the “First Step Act,” which offers early release to many federal prisoners, is that the type of people federal prosecutors pursue on drug or racketeering charges are often the worst transnational gang or cartel murderers. It’s just that it’s so hard to land a conviction that they often arrange a plea deal.

These individuals in this case are all charged with racketeering in the process of drug trafficking. Some were charged with murder, but not all. There are two under-seal cases pending against juvenile defendants, where the charges are still not public.



In five years from now, expect agitation groups and even “conservative” senators to use some of these “youngsters” as poster children for people being sentenced too long for low-level crimes. That is what they are doing now, but this is a glimpse into the front end of how many wind up with long sentences on charges of racketeering or drugs. Usually, that is not why the feds pursued them to begin with, but we only hear about the technical conviction and not the story behind it.

Congress and many in the executive branch have no interest in fighting for the American people and shutting off the flow of illegal immigrants from Central America. The only legislation they have successfully passed is a bill to cut the sentences of brutal criminals like these MS-13 animals.


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Author: Daniel Horowitz

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.