Accused serial rapist released on $10K bond, then arraigned for 9th rape

· October 31, 2019  
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Handcuffs, gavel, law book
Valerii Evlakhov | Getty Images

We’re accustomed to seeing violent criminals released on little or no bond in New York, Chicago, and California, but evidently, this jailbreak is occurring even in Alaska. The cases seem to get worse as time goes on, as political momentum among the judges and politicians tilts even further to the criminals. Such is the case of Kayshawn Dyett.

In May 2018, Dyett was arrested for first-degree rape after two women independently accused him of rape on the same day in April. In what has become a growing jailbreak epidemic in all 50 states, Dyett was released on just $5,000 bond in July of that year, even though police believed there were more victims. He was placed under house arrest with an ankle monitor, but these monitors have been proven unreliable in deterring violent criminals.

Shortly after his release, six more women came forward with similar rape accusations, and Dyett was indicted on a total of 12 rape charges against eight women. According to KTVA, “Some of Dyett’s accusers testified at a bail hearing, imploring the court to keep Dyett in custody, fearing for their safety and the safety of others.” Under normal circumstances, a man like this would be held without bail or on over $1 million cash bail, yet prosecutors only asked for $100,000. The defense attorney accused the women of being part of the #MeToo exploitation and implored the judge to keep the bail at $5,000. Anchorage Superior Court Judge Kevin Saxby set Dyett free on just $10,000 bail. He even allowed Dyett to stay out of jail for two additional weeks so he could come up with the paltry sum, ultimately enabling him to remain out on the streets for an entire additional year, despite the indictments for eight separate rapes.

As KTVA reports, according to court documents, Dyett violated the terms of his bail twice in recent months, including the second time last month when he met the ninth alleged victim.

A different judge, Michael Wolverton, responded in September by increasing his bail … by $1,000. Dyett easily paid the sum. 15 days later, on October 10, 2019, Dyett is accused of raping and strangling a ninth victim in a manner consistent with the other cases.

At last Thursday’s arraignment, Judge Patrick McKay set the new cash bail at $500,000, which is still historically low for one accused of such heinous crimes.

As I chronicled in my profile of New York’s abolish-bail policies, the problem with releasing dangerous criminals pretrial, often for years, is not just the fact that it provides them with more opportunities to victimize and commit more crimes. It makes it hard to convict them for the first crime(s), because a successful conviction hinges upon testimony from victims and witnesses. They are scared enough to come forward even with the criminal locked up. Imagine this man out on the streets with the rape victims knowing that they are targets with no protection. Sadly, this is done by design – it’s a feature, not a bug, of the “bail reform” agenda – for the purpose of reducing the prison population at all costs.



It’s a demonstratable lie that the move to reduce jail time pretrial and prison time post-conviction is only for “first-time, non-violent, low-level” criminals. This “reform” is applied to the worst criminals and repeat offenders imaginable, including accused serial rapists like Dyett. And no, ankle monitors are not the answer, especially as local police departments have an increasing caseload of so many violent prisoners to monitor – both pretrial bond offenders and post-conviction offenders who get placed on probation instead of serving more time. In Chicago, for example, there are only 100 cops to watch over the parole of 2,000 mainly violent felons.

Just last week, in Washington County, Oregon, a man charged with 18 brutal child sex offenses who was let out on bail cut off his ankle monitor and remains at large. Josiah Rosales, 29, was arrested on numerous rape charges against children in July, but was only required to post 10 percent of his $1.25 million bail in September, after which he was released with a GPS-tracking ankle monitor.

Yet leftist Democrats and Republicans in almost every state think not enough criminals are let out. Harris County, Texas, is in the process of getting rid of cash bail for most people arrested, including for violating protective orders and assault.

At a hearing this Monday in Harris County on the issue of abolishing bail for all misdemeanors, Houston Police Officers’ Union attorney Mary Nan Huffman used the example of a woman who found a man who was stalking her outside her home window holding a knife in one hand and his genitals in the other while starring at her. That sounds pretty scary, but under the plan to abolish bail, this man would be released after being booked. Huffman said, “Without a bond hearing, no one would know his criminal history, how he’s committed rapes and been in and out of prison.”

There is further concern from Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton that such policies will lead to the release of criminal aliens before ICE is able to apprehend them. This is already happening in the blue states, in one of the many ways that jailbreak merges with sanctuary policies to create one massive public safety nightmare.

This movement to dismantle criminal justice with no regard for public safety and victims of crime is sickening, but it’s quietly gaining steam without the public even being aware of it. President Trump is the only one who has the megaphone to stop it in its tracks. He’s already given the “abolish prison” crowd a victory with the ridiculous First Step Act. Now it’s time for him to fulfill his promise to be tough on crime and actually begin fighting back against the jailbreak movement.


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Author: Daniel Horowitz

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.