Bill Maher tries to fix the unfixable

· October 17, 2018  
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Sign: More Political Correctness Ahead
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I’ve written about Bill Maher before. He and I seem to share a penchant for trying to fix what might be the politically unfixable. And despite our differences, I dig that about him.

It was just this past March when I tipped my cap to him for taking on the prevalence of fake news. I wrote:

“If various sectors of the ideological spectrum (like Bill Maher) can still unify around disdain for horse manure, then we can have the sort of vehement but honest debate previous eras of our ancestors were fortunate to use to iron out their differences. In a truth-seeking culture, we can find ways to accommodate even differences on what the truth is.

But a culture that has given up on truth-seeking, and only considers what it wants to be true to be the truth, is a culture that has essentially given up on itself.”

All these months later, it’s clear few people on the Left listened to either Maher or me, as the 2018 midterm elections hover just weeks away. The proof came yet again recently on Maher’s television show, as he took on the cancer of political correctness within the Democrat party.

Maher accurately pointed out, with both anecdotal evidence and polling numbers, that increasing numbers of Americans identify political correctness as a brand of weakness. That’s why Trump in 2016, he said, and that’s why there may be no blue wave in 2018.

Then he turned it over to his panelists, and they unintentionally proved to be the perfect foils for Maher’s point.



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Princeton Professor Eddie Glaude, who is that school’s chair of the Center for African American studies, actually countered that it isn’t politically correct at all that the guy who bears as much responsibility as anyone for freeing the slaves – President Abraham Lincoln – really wasn’t that cool of a white guy after all. I’m not kidding. He really did that.

To which Maher should have responded by setting himself on fire in hopelessness and disgust. Because if President Lincoln can’t get the benefit of the doubt on the political correctness scale, then Maher is just barking at the moon in his attempt to rescue progressives from themselves.

But wait, there’s more! With the cult of progressivism, there’s always more.

Not to be outdone, Rebecca Traister, who authored the book “Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger,” insinuated over and over again that Trump’s presidency is illegitimate because, obviously, we live in a republic and a minority of the people voted for him. So screw the Electoral College, and there’s clearly nothing wrong with falsely accusing an innocent man like Brett Kavanaugh in order to make up for all of that. #believeallwomeunlesstheyaccusetheClintonsorsomething

So her political correctness dial is clearly stuck on 11 then. Got it. Moving on.

Moving on where, though? Well, there’s one thing Traister is correct about: There is a revolution going on.

Maher would rightly prefer to dial things back a few notches and sort this thing out on the playing field of actual ideas, which to his credit he has always done regardless of whether or not we applaud the fundamentals of his worldview. His guests, on the other hand, often only talk about ideas as cover for obtaining the raw power they desire, to break the things of the past that define American exceptionalism.

Faith. Freedom. Family. Whatever progressives stand for, it’s largely because they came to hate those things first. They have every intent to destroy them and replace them with fantastic golden idols, and if political correctness can get them there in a culture that has an obvious talent for infantile levels of emotional and psychological manipulation, then that’s exactly what is going to happen.

Got it, Maher? This ain’t about reason. It’s about a riot.

Author: Steve Deace

Steve Deace is broadcast nationally each weeknight on CRTV. He is the author of the book “A Nefarious Plot.”