Can the system burn down the system?

· January 28, 2016  
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Donald Trump is one of 11 politicians speaking at the 2015 Lincoln Dinner in Des Moines, Iowa about the 2016 presidential election. John Pemble | Flickr

At this point, any conservative supporting Donald Trump recognizes he is not really a conservative and has never been one. However, they are justifiably tantalized by the prospect of electing a president who will burn down the system and actually slay the leviathan of political correctness that is embedded in every corner of our government and culture. That, they say, is more important than simply holding conservative views in the abstract.

As I’ve noted before, I’m sympathetic to this argument, but the problem for Trump is that he’s now expressing his desire to work with the system.

To build on this point for a moment, it’s important to remember that the government-corporate complex has become one of the most coercive and powerful tools in enforcing political correctness in this country. We saw it this year with the corporate fascism in which large corporations — whether willingly or out of fear — promoted homo-fascism against religious liberty and became obsessed with affirmative action and political correctness. Their alacrity to divest from states that defend religious liberty and their obsession with banning the confederate flag were just two examples of this obnoxious trend of political correctness run amok.

The courts and the administrative state, along with their willing accomplices in corporate America, have infringed upon the basic freedoms of speech and property rights of all citizens in order to worship the pagan gods of political correctness through affirmative action. Affirmative action is one of the most destructive and unconstitutional edicts that is tearing our country apart. Earlier this week, Market Watch ran a fascinating article on a poll showing how white Americans believe the American Dream is out of reach more than ever before.

Ironically, many of those drawn to Trump believe he is the man to end this nonsense. But as a man who is the product of corporate America, what does Trump believe on affirmative action?

He said he was ‘fine with affirmative action,’ noting ‘we’ve lived with it for a long time,’ though many conservatives have argued it’s unnecessary today. He also said he’s willing to back recent court decisions banning private companies from firing employees because of their sexual orientation — and that he himself agrees with the decision. ‘I don’t think it should be a reason’ employers can use to fire workers, he said. [Meet the Press, August 16, 2015]

So Trump is OK with the corporate-government complex granting super-rights to arbitrarily defined protected classes. Also, in a disturbing pattern of affinity for a strong judiciary, he seems fine with the courts redefining fundamental rights from the bench.

This also tells you that he has not departed from his positions of the past. In 2000, Trump, in his own words, led the advocacy to bring homo-fascism into the corporate world:

I like the idea of amending the 1964 Civil Rights Act to include a ban on discrimination based on sexual orientation. It would be simple. It would be straightforward. We don’t need to rewrite the laws currently on the books, although I do think we need to address hate-crimes legislation. But amending the Civil Rights Act would grant the same protection to gay people that we give to other Americans — it’s only fair. I actually suggested this first, and now I see [Democratic presidential candidate] Bill Bradley has jumped on the bandwagon and is claiming the idea as his own. [Interview with a gay publication, The Advocate, p. 22, February 15, 2000] 

Keep in mind, Trump’s support for the homosexual agenda being codified into law was not just prior to his cathartic conversion to conservatism. This is the same man who just said that Kim Davis should have followed “the law of the land.”

Also, as a businessman he hired scores of illegal aliens to work for his companies and consistently supported amnesty until running for president and realizing what the voters wanted to hear. He also lobbied for more foreign workers.

Many Trump defenders excuse his support for liberal causes, amnesty for illegals, donations to Democrats, and connections to leftists — you might just call them New York values — as the hallmark of a pragmatic businessman. But they are missing the point. Indeed, the corporate world is overrun by political correctness and New York values just as much as the field of politics. If he lacked the guts (or conviction) to stand up to the system as a businessman why would he be any different in the White House? Political correctness is a way of life in the ruling class system — whether it’s in the political side or the corporate side of elite power. He lived in that system and championed political correctness. When you read the fine print, it becomes evident he still does.

Which begs the question: How can you burn down the system when you are the system?


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Author: Daniel Horowitz

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.