Levin: Bernie Sanders won’t ‘condemn the genocidal dictator’ in Venezuela ‘because he believes in his ideology’

· February 25, 2019  
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Senator Bernie Sanders
Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

Friday on the radio, LevinTV host Mark Levin explained why socialism and collectivism are so effective in winning over American hearts and minds, despite their pernicious effects on society.

Levin read from his book “Rediscovering Americanism” and discussed the political philosophy of Russian-British political theorist and philosopher Isaiah Berlin, who said that not enough concern is given to the political academics and intellectuals, whose ideas determine the future of politics and of humanity itself.

“In fact, ladies and gentlemen … there is no debate,” Levin said. “We never engage, except at a very superficial level. We never explain humanity, nature, individualism, freedom. ‘Who’s gonna pay for that? Who’s gonna pay for that?’ It’s a good question, but we’re not going to win hearts and souls and minds.”

Levin explained that Berlin found this both surprising and dangerous, since so many societies today have been significantly changed or violently upset by fanatical social and political ideas, which Berlin called “dangerous.”

“‘When ideas are neglected by those who ought to attend to them’ — that is, the citizen,” Levin read, “‘That is to say, those who have been trained to think critically about ideas, they sometimes acquire an unchecked momentum, and are irresistible, an irresistible power over multitudes of men and women that may grow too violent to be affected by rational criticism.” And so yesterday when I played Bernie Sanders saying, ‘Well, what we need is a vote, a fair election in Venezuela,’ and I was pointing out they’re beyond that. He will not condemn the genocidal dictator, because he believes in his ideology. Berlin would say that’s preposterous, Bernie Sanders. You’re taking about a vote, when the man is destroying his country.”

Listen:

“It’s not a question of governing yourself, it is the extent to which you can compel other people to do what you want them to do, so you can be all you can be. You see what I’m saying? ‘I want universal healthcare. I want free college. I want this, I want that.’ Well, you’re enslaving other people. You’re denying them their liberty. Maybe they don’t want it,” Levin said.


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Author: Carmel Kookogey