The battle for the future of the Republican Party

· January 10, 2019  
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Donald Trump and Mitt Romney
Drew Angerer, Mandel Ngan | Getty Images

Mitt Romney’s op-ed attack on President Trump is the perfect example of why for years, grassroots conservatives have been begging, pleading, and pushing for a different path for the Republican Party in order to fight back against the far-left lurch of the Democrat Party. Instead of standing up and challenging the socialist/communist agenda of the Democrats, Romney and the old GOP told us to repeat after them: “At least [RINO candidate X] is better than the Democrats.” Mitt just proved he’s not. The list of RINOs just like him is long, and they’re not going anywhere.

It’s been ten years since the Tea Party sprang up in full force because a wide swath of the American people realized what the Democrat Party had become and rejected the quisling nature of the old guard of the GOP. But the Republican leadership, like fattened sows, refused to budge an inch, refused to stand by their own platform, and chased the false notion of political ascendency through positive press.

So when President Trump fights against the mainstream press, the old guard Republicans denounce him because it’s the press they believe will make them “palatable” to the masses. They are as inflexible as socialists and continue to attack the American way of life. And just like socialism, chasing positive press for Republicans is a tired old gambit that can never work. The news media, dominated by leftists, imprints its worldview into daily news consumption, and much of the American people know it. As time wears on, any positive press for Republicans is viewed skeptically by the core of the Republican Party, the conservative grassroots.

Old guard Republicans are lying to themselves and the rest of us. Accepting the Left’s direction for the country is not standing on the moral high ground. Yet in the battle for the future of the Republican Party, there remains a large group of older Republicans, the Whig type, who believe they are upholding the “Grand Old Party” by standing astride the blurred line of progressivism: accepting the false premises of the media and accusing people, including the president, of racism, sexism, and Nazism. They are confused and conflicted because it has always been that they thought they sought peace with their “friends across the aisle.” They are convinced that they can win only if they are more palatable to the press for mass consumption. Trump’s presidency is proving them very wrong, and they know no other way.

For the old guard GOP, Romney represents a segment of “our better angels,” but to suggest that Romney, a politician who has ushered in mostly anti-liberty ideas, has much in common with wholesomeness and morality is offensive and non-discerning. He was the originator of the largest government takeover ever, Obamacare, while a governor of dark blue Massachusetts, then hightailed it to conservative Utah, where they didn’t exactly roll out the red carpet for him. How did he manage to make it? Is he a supposed “better angel?” Or does he just look the part while stealing away, brick by brick, the fortress of American greatness?

Looking back, it’s amazing how thoroughly the Republican Party swallowed whole the cockamamie plan to become “better angels” of widespread socialism.

As Tea Partiers we called them RINOs, and they can be recognized as the lowest common denominator of widespread dissatisfaction with the Republican Party as grassroots voices grow louder and louder. In contrast, Trump is doing a better job of listening to conservative voices, so much so that great conservative strides have been taken in the past two years.

But the battle for the future of the Republican Party goes on, and many obstacles lie ahead, not the least of which are more reckless spending by both parties without an end in sight, more frivolous investigations of the president, and this wall of quislings in the Republican Party who ought to be called out and mocked.

The Republican Party cannot be dragged back to the days of being a party whose constant drumbeat of morality always ignored or, worse, defended the immorality of socialist policy. It cannot ignore the working men and women of the so-called middle-class who are squeezed between progressive taxation and wealth redistribution. And most of all, it must never again abandon the greatness of the individual and his or her contributions to our great nation.

The socialists/communists are not to be ignored or trifled with. Their main philosophy is force. Their policies run against human nature and always end in mass graves.

The influence within the Republican Party going forward must not come from phony would-be socialists who seek the approval of those tearing down this nation. The battle for the future of the Republican Party must be seen as the battle against the destroyers of a great nation, and it’s not going to be won by comparing Boy Scout patches.


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Author: Jen Kuznicki

Jen Kuznicki is a contributor to Conservative Review, a blue-collar wife and mom, a political writer, humorist, and conservative activist, a seamstress by trade, and compelled to write. Follow her on Twitter @JenKuznicki.