Dawkins can't believe his atheist ally has become a Christian. Ayaan Hirsi Ali explains the error of his doubt.

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Ayaan Hirsi Ali was once a central figure among the so-called "New Atheists." She revealed in a Nov. 11, 2023, op-ed that she had converted to Christianity, both for the meaning it provides as well as for its unifying doctrine, which she wrote can "fortify us against our menacing foes."

Militant atheist Richard Dawkins, her longtime friend and "mentor," penned an open letter to Ali three days later, suggesting the Dutch-American human rights activist, mother, and staunch critic of Islam was insincere about her newfound faith.

"You are no more a Christian than I am," wrote Dawkins. "No, Ayaan, you are not a Christian, you are just a decent human being who mistakenly thinks you need a religion in order to remain so."

It appears Ali's sincerity is just one more thing Dawkins has managed to get wrong.

Ali appeared on stage Saturday with Dawkins for the inaugural Dissident Dialogues conference in New York City, where she identified a number of her past intellectual missteps — apparent missteps Dawkins is alternatively committed to keep making — and made abundantly clear both to the audience and Dawkins that she does, in fact, believe in God, pray, and follow Christ.

The former atheist's profession of faith and admission of past errors electrified the audience, which appeared altogether keen to celebrate both Dawkins' loss of a fellow traveler and Christians' gain of a sister.

Background

Blaze News previously reported that Ali, who lives under a fatwa, was raised Muslim in Somalia. Under what she came to regard as a "nihilistic cult of death," Ali suffered genital mutilation, was denied her artistic loves, and was married off to a distant cousin.

While already chased down the road to apostasy by brutal oppression, the Sept. 11, 2001, Islamic terrorist attacks on the U.S. helped accelerate Ali's rejection of Islam. Ali's antipathy toward Islam apparently prompted her not only to reject the Muslim faith but "to adopt an attitude of scepticism towards religious doctrine, discard my faith in God and declare that no such entity existed."

Decades later, she recognized that atheism is a "weak and divisive doctrine."

Ali explained last year in an article for UnHerd that she became a Christian in part because the faith equips believers to internally and externally fight the evils of the day — battles atheism is at best useless in but more often than not on the wrong side of.

Quoting the Catholic apologist G.K. Chesterton, Ali stressed that "when men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything."

"We can't withstand China, Russia and Iran if we can't explain to our populations why it matters that we do. We can't fight woke ideology if we can't defend the civilisation that it is determined to destroy. And we can't counter Islamism with purely secular tools," wrote Ali. "Unless we offer something as meaningful, I fear the erosion of our civilisation will continue. And fortunately, there is no need to look for some new-age concoction of medication and mindfulness. Christianity has it all."

Ali indicated, however, that Christianity was not simply a sword and a shield for the wars of the age but also a source of ultimate meaning.

"I have also turned to Christianity because I ultimately found life without any spiritual solace unendurable — indeed very nearly self-destructive," wrote Ali. "Atheism failed to answer a simple question: what is the meaning and purpose of life?"

Dawkins loses an ally

Dawkins, now a self-described "Cultural Christian," responded to Ali's profession of faith on Substack with his characteristic disbelief, writing, "Christianity makes factual claims, truth claims that Christians believe, truth claims that define them as Christian. Christians are theists. They believe in a divine father figure who designed the universe, listens to our prayers, is privy to our every thought. You surely don't believe that."

"Do you believe Jesus rose from the grave three days after being placed there? Of course you don’t. Do you believe Jesus was born to a virgin? Certainly not," wrote Dawkins. "Someone of your intelligence does not believe you have an immortal soul, which will survive the decay of your brain. Christians believe in a frightful place called Hell, where the souls of the wicked go after they are dead. Do you believe that? Hell no!"

In his response, the atheist conceded Ali's points that Christianity might have "been the inspiration for some of the greatest art, architecture and music the world has ever known," "is morally superior to Islam," and might be "a powerful weapon" against "Putinism, Islamism, and postmodernish wokery pokery" but suggested that such an understanding does not make one a Christian.

Dawkins further suggested that by embracing Christianity, she had succumbed to "weakness."

In March, Dawkins doubled-down, accusing Ali of being a "Political Christian" and noting, "Let's not agree to differ. Let's agree that we don't really differ."

Soulful showdown

Ali addressed Dawkins' doubts about her faith Saturday, indicated she is far more than just a "Political Christian," and expressed regret for having previously aided militant atheists in their attack on religion, reported UnHerd.

With regards to the sincerity of her belief, Ali made clear that while she regards Christianity as critically important from a secular and political viewpoint, she has connected with the faith on a spiritual level and believes in its supernatural propositions.

"On the personal level, yes, I choose to believe in God. And I think that there, we might say, let's agree to disagree," she said. "I think it's something subjective, and it's a choice and there are things that you see and perceive that a different person cannot perceive."

"I'd say you're coming at this from a place of 'there is nothing,' and what has happened to me is that, I think, I have accepted that there is something," said Ali. "When you accept that there is something, there is a powerful entity, for me, the God that turned me around, I think what the vicar is saying no longer sounds nonsensical."

"It makes a great deal of sense, and not only does it make a great deal of sense, it's also layered with the wisdom of millennia," said the former atheist. "And so, like you, I did mock faith in general, Christianity in particular, but I don't do that anymore, and again, I think that's where humility comes into it."

The former atheist's journey to Christ appears to have not only required great humility but some helpful advice.

"I've come down to my knees to say perhaps those people who have always had faith have something that we who lost faith don't have, and people who have faith also, like the woman who told me, 'You ... fight everything and you've lost hope, you've lost faith. Try it. Pray.' I think just in that one word there is so much wisdom," added Ali.

When Ayaan Hirsi Ali wrote that she had become Christian, it sounded political.\n\nBut last night she revealed what happened: a spiritual awakening after suicidal depression. Dawkins probed, highlighting \u201cnonsense the vicar says\u201d and Christianity being \u201cobsessed with sin.\u201d Then:
— (@)

Dawkins recycled one of his go-to smears, suggesting Christianity is obsessed with sin. Ali didn't buy the atheist's premise.

"I find that Christianity is actually obsessed with love," Ali said, eliciting applause from the audience. "The teaching of Christ as I see it — and again, I'm a brand new Christian — but what I'm finding out, which is the opposite of growing up as a Muslim and the message of Islam, but the message of Christianity of love. It's a message of redemption."

"It's a story of renewal and birth," continued Ali. "And so, Jesus dying and rising again for me symbolizes that story, and in a small way, I felt I had died and was reborn. And that story of redemption and birth, I think makes Christianity actually a very, very powerful story for the human condition, of human existence."

When Ayaan Hirsi Ali wrote that she had become Christian, it sounded political.\n\nBut last night she revealed what happened: a spiritual awakening after suicidal depression. Dawkins probed, highlighting \u201cnonsense the vicar says\u201d and Christianity being \u201cobsessed with sin.\u201d Then:
— (@)

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Atheist Richard Dawkins now labels himself a 'cultural Christian': Here's why

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Famous atheist Richard Dawkins has spent years criticizing religion, but in a recent interview, Dawkins told Rachel Johnson of LBC, “I count myself a cultural Christian.”

“I love hymns and Christmas carols, and I sort of feel at home in the Christian ethos. If I had to choose between Christianity and Islam, I choose Christianity every single time,” Dawkins continued.

He explained his reason being that Christianity is a “fundamentally decent religion” while “Islam is not.”

When questioned on this belief, he responded that the Quran is fundamentally hostile to women and gays, and he likes “to live in a culturally Christian country,” although he doesn’t “believe a single word of the Christian faith.”

Pat Gray is shocked.

“That seems like a shift in his ethos, if you will,” he says.

“I will say, cultural Christianity from Richard Dawkins [is] pretty interesting. You know why? Because he has seen the decay of society and civilization, that’s why. He sees our very civilization crumbling around us and what keeps it together,” Gray adds.

America was founded on Christian values, and Dawkins is recognizing what happens when the masses reject those values.

“Once you’ve built your foundation on those principles and then people start taking a jackhammer to it, something bad is going to happen. And he understands that now,” Gray says.


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Republican lawmaker blasts museum for featuring satanic tree at Christmas festival: 'Upside-down cultural propaganda'

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The National Railroad Museum in Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin, is getting into the Christmas spirit with hot chocolate, holiday sing-alongs, and a train ride dressed up as the titular railway from "The Polar Express" for children. The museum also figured it's the season to greet families with a satanic monument and an LGBT propaganda stand.

A Republican congressman has joined some locals in blasting the museum, calling its inclusion of exhibits celebrating the devil and child sex changes "offensive, upside-down cultural propaganda."

The museum is currently celebrating its annual Festival of Trees event, which runs from Nov. 16 until Dec. 31. The festival has been around since 2007 and is reportedly one of the museum's biggest fundraisers.

The Green Bay Press-Gazette indicated that there is nothing explicitly Christian about 60 of the 66 trees featured this year. However, two of the trees are outright hostile to Christianity and the beliefs of its adherents.

The Wisconsin chapter of the Satanic Temple successfully entered its red-lit tree into the festival. The tree is adorned with Luciferian symbols and topped with a red pentacle. In addition to upside-down crosses, there is an ornament that says, "HAIL SANTA."

At the base of the tree is what appears to be a coiled snake along with an icon of the demon Baphomet, depicted with uncovered breasts.

The Satanic Temple is an atheistic leftist organization that has sought to ensure that women can legally have their unborn children killed by way of their "religious abortion ritual"; distributed satanic literature to children; publicly performed "unbaptisms"; held a demonization ceremony in protest of the canonization of the Catholic Spanish priest Junípero Serra; and erected statues of Baphomet on government property.

Blaze News previously indicated that the temple also runs an online clinic out of New Mexico that distributes abortion drugs, which the group has dubbed "Samuel Alito's Mom's Satanic Abortion Clinic."

Jacqueline Frank, the CEO of the museum, told the Press-Gazette that upon receiving the satanists' application to sponsor and decorate a tree, "There was no hesitation. We're not a religious organization. We focus on trains."

"And honestly, the Christmas tree is used by so many different secular and religious organizations. All we're doing is putting up decoration in that room," said Frank.

While the museum has a rule against decorations promoting violence, sexual content, and drug abuse, Frank evidently figured the depiction of a demon with breasts exposed was all right for a museum welcoming families with young children.

Frank underscored that she was proud to include the anti-Christian activist group's tree and would "absolutely" have the organization back next year.

The other leftist tree featured at Frank's festival was decorated by the radical Bay Area Council on Gender Diversity.

The BACGD is an activist group that advocates on behalf of transvestites and provides a drop-in opportunity for gender-dysphoric minors from the greater Green Bay area.

The transvestite activists' tree is decorated with numerous so-called transgender flag along with agitprop ornaments. One ornament read, "Protect Trans Kids." Another stated, "Drag queen." Other ornaments reportedly affirmed gender dysphoria and transvestism.

Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-Wisc.) told Fox News' "Sunday Morning Futures," "It's impossible to overstate how offensive this is to Christians. It would be, in quite a literal sense, the same thing as waving a Hamas flag inside of a synagogue."

"Conservatives are often accused of launching a culture war or focusing or fixating on cultural issues. But here is a perfect example of how that's not what's happening. What's happening is we're just trying to defend basic traditions or defend our children in the midst of these basic traditions from the encroachment of woke ideology or offensive, upside-down cultural propaganda," said Gallagher.

"The shame of it is ... every year the National Railroad Museum does something very interesting and cool and fun for kids, which is they do a big screening of 'Polar Express' and you're surrounded by all the trains, and it's a cool, fun thing to take your kids to," continued Gallagher. "But now ... I don't want my kids to be surrounded by satanic trees."

Matt Batzel, executive director of the conservative grassroots outfit American Majority, tweeted, "Outrageous! National Railroad Museum features a Satanic worship tree."

Pasor Luke Farwell of De Pere, Wisconsin, told Fox News Digital that when he questioned the museum over the the satanic tree, he was met with rhetoric about "inclusivity."

"It seemed a little bizarre to me that someone, based on that, would think it was appropriate to have a Satanic Temple Christmas tree — or tree, I should say. I won't dignify it by calling it a Christmas tree," said Farwell.

Farwell suggested that Christians aren't afforded the kind of latitude they are expected to show radical leftists when it comes to the public expression and profession of their deeply held views. The pastor also noted that the leftists may have a legal right to advance their viewpoints but ought to understand that "Christians find these things to be offensive or definitely targeting them in terms of belittling their faith or how they celebrate the holidays."

The pastor appealed to an insight from C.S. Lewis in closing, quoting the Christian writer as saying, "There is no neutral ground in the universe. Every square inch, every split second is claimed by God, and counterclaimed by Satan."

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Prominent atheist Ayaan Hirsi Ali publicly professes her newfound faith: 'Christianity has it all'

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A central figure among the so-called "New Atheists" revealed in an essay Monday that she has turned to Christianity, not only for the meaning and solace it provides but for its strong and unifying doctrine, which she reckons can "fortify us against our menacing foes."

Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Dutch-American women's rights activist, mother, and former politician who ruffled feathers by calling Islam a "nihilistic cult of death" beyond reforming, noted in UnHerd that atheism is a "weak and divisive doctrine" that offers no hope, no anchorage, and no defense against destructive forces at home and abroad.

Ali, who still lives under a fatwa, was raised Muslim in Somalia. In addition to suffering genital mutilation and getting married off to a distant cousin, she was told that many of the things she loved, including music, dancing, and movies, were accursed worldly pleasures and instruments of damnation. Her encounters with the Muslim Brotherhood in Kenya helped cement her antipathy for Islam.

Although no longer a practicing Muslim at the time, Ali noted that the Sept. 11, 2001, Islamist attacks on the United States expedited her rejection of religion. The next year, she read British mathematician Bertrand Russell's 1927 lecture "Why I Am Not a Christian" and "found [her] cognitive dissonance easing."

"It was a relief to adopt an attitude of scepticism towards religious doctrine, discard my faith in God and declare that no such entity existed," wrote Ali. "Best of all, I could reject the existence of hell and the danger of everlasting punishment."

Apparently satisfied with the prospect of rotting in the ground, as Russell posited, rather than in some infernal destination, Ali went on to become a prominent atheist, speaking at various conventions and winning the adulation of various secularists.

David Silverman, the former president of the anti-religion organization American Atheists, touted Ali as a "champion of atheist thought" and "atheism activism" ahead of her 2015 keynote speech at the American Atheists National Convention.

Ali suggested that while the fear she had been convinced was a feature of religion had not gone away with her embrace of atheism, she was nevertheless confident that she had made the right choice. After all, "the atheists were clever" and a "great deal of fun," particularly the late Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins.

However, good wit and good times were not enough to slake Ali's thirst for meaning.

Ali indicated that her conversion to Christianity — which she previously wished for Muslims across the world — is the result of multiple factors.

"Part of the answer is global. Western civilisation is under threat from three different but related forces: the resurgence of great-power authoritarianism and expansionism in the forms of the Chinese Community Party and Vladimir Putin's Russia; the rise of global Islamism, which threatens to mobilise a vast population against the West; and the viral spread of woke ideology, which is eating into the moral fibre of the next generation," wrote Ali.

According to Ali, secular tools have proven wholly ineffective against these dark forces.

"We can't fight off these formidable forces unless we can answer the question: what is it that unites? The response that 'God is dead!' seems insufficient. So, too, does the attempt to find solace in 'the rules-based liberal international order,'" she continued. "The only credible answer, I believe, lies in our desire to uphold the legacy of the Judeo-Christian tradition."

Noting that the cultural, legal, and social inheritance secularists most prize is rooted in Christianity, Ali said, "I have come to realise that Russell and my atheist friends failed to see the wood for the trees. The wood is the civilisation built on the Judeo-Christian tradition; it is the story of the West, warts and all."

Trouncing the West's internal and external foes is not Ali's only reason for embracing the faith.

"I have also turned to Christianity because I ultimately found life without any spiritual solace unendurable — indeed very nearly self-destructive," wrote Ali. "Atheism failed to answer a simple question: what is the meaning and purpose of life?"

Ali noted that Russell's presumption that "reason and intelligent humanism" come after the fall of religion was wrong. The "God hole" left in the human heart has not gone away but rather has been "filled by a jumble of irrational quasi-religious dogma. The result is a world where modern cults prey on the dislocated masses, offering them spurious reasons for being and action — mostly by engaging in virtue-signalling theatre on behalf of a victimised minority or our supposedly doomed planet."

Quoting the Catholic apologist G.K. Chesterton, who penned an essay defending his religiosity a year before Russell's lecture, Ali underscored that "when men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything."

"We can't withstand China, Russia and Iran if we can't explain to our populations why it matters that we do. We can't fight woke ideology if we can't defend the civilisation that it is determined to destroy. And we can't counter Islamism with purely secular tools," wrote Ali. "Unless we offer something as meaningful, I fear the erosion of our civilisation will continue. And fortunately, there is no need to look for some new-age concoction of medication and mindfulness. Christianity has it all."

While admitting she has "a great deal to learn about Christianity," Ali indicated she understands that it is "a better way to manage the challenges of existence than either Islam or unbelief had to offer."

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FASCINATING: Does the right need MORE atheism? Here’s one evolutionary biologist’s compelling argument

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One of the biggest debates of our current day revolves around gender. What is gender? How is it different from biological sex? Do feelings determine truth?

Allie Beth Stuckey invites evolutionary biologist Dr. Colin Wright on the show to discuss these highly inflammatory topics.

Surprisingly, Allie and Dr. Wright agree on a number of these controversies despite the fact that Dr. Wright is an atheist while Allie is a Christian.

“Men who are naturally very feminine – this doesn't mean they're born in the wrong body; this doesn't mean they have a gender identity of a female,” says Dr. Wright, adding that it’s entirely possible and even normal for someone to be “gender non-conforming.”

“Sex atypicality is a thing; this shouldn’t be shunned,” but how someone chooses to express themselves should not affect “sports and changing rooms [and] what prisons you go to,” he tells Allie.

Where the two differ is on the subject of the origins of truth. While Allie sees God as the ultimate arbiter of truth, Dr. Wright looks to science.

But does this ultimately matter when they arrive at the same conclusion? Both agree biological sex is fixed and that someone’s feelings do not change that, even if they arrived at that conclusion via different ideologies.

Dr. Wright even says that despite his “evolutionary perspective,” he connects better with Christians than the woke crowd because Christians and atheists both “acknowledge the reality of biological sex,” while progressives “think their reality is constructed through language.”

And since this gender debate has grown even more intense and divisive, Dr. Wright thinks Republicans would be wise to embrace more atheists.

In a recent interview between Charlie Kirk and Tucker Carlson, Tucker said that he finds atheism – the complete rejection of divinity – “childish” and “hilarious.”

To this, Dr. Wright responded with “the right needs more atheism.”

“What I don't mean is that I think the people on the right who are Christians need to convert to atheism and denounce their God,” he clarifies.

“I think that there are a lot of atheists who are disaffected from the left,” he explains, adding that many prominent figures in the atheist community are “opposed to the woke takeover.”

“A lot of us feel politically homeless,” he explains, “and we feel more affinity to the values that we see that are over on the right that are shared by many Christians, even though we're not Christian ourselves.”

Dr. Wright thinks that the right needs to focus on “shared values” rather than “where these values came from” and in doing so grow the number of people fighting to save objective truth.

“Some core principle values related to free speech … [and] the limits of certain governments – you know, these are the things that I think matter most in terms of morality and connecting with people” rather than “was this the result of evolution or was this … done by a divine creator,” he tells Allie.

To hear their full conversation, watch the video below.


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Atheist 'Grinches' bully Kansas school to drop annual Operation Christmas Child project; school caves to demands



Operation Christmas Child is an annual program operated by Franklin Graham's Samaritan's Purse. Every year, Americans fill millions of shoeboxes with toys, clothing, toiletries, and other necessities for children around the world.

Liberty Middle School in Pratt, Kansas, had been a part of that program before and was set to participate again this year, Christian Headlines reported.

That is until the Freedom From Religion Foundation — an atheists group known for harassing communities and schools that do not adhere to the organization's absolutist stance on the separation of church and state — heard about it and sent a letter to the school district demanding that the school abandon its chartable efforts with Operation Christmas Child immediately.

In the letter to Superintendent Tony Helfrich, FFRF staff attorney Christopher Line claimed that a "concerned staff member" had contacted the organization to complain about "many egregious constitutional violations" at Liberty Middle School, including participation in Operation Christmas Child.

"Our complainant also reports that Principal Ryan Creadick has directed staff members to arrange for the school to participate in 'Operation Christmas Child,' which is a charity project sponsored by Samaritan's Purse, which describes the program as a 'shoebox ministry,'" Line wrote, insisting that the school "cease participation in Operation Christmas Child."

FFRF's letter said the charitable event was bad news for the school because it is sponsored by Samaritan's Purse, which the atheist group decried as a "pervasively sectarian religious organization." According to FFRF, by being involved with Operation Christmas Child, the school is essentially "employ[ing] school staff and resources to convert people to Christianity."

School gives in

Upon receiving the letter, the Superintendent Helfrich caved and abandoned the annual Christmas charity.

FFRF touted its victory on its website Friday, and highlighted a statement of defeat from Helfrich.

"Regarding our students' participation in 'Operation Christmas Child,' we are discontinuing that effort upon learning that its mission is more sectarian in nature than we realized," the superintendent wrote in a letter to the organization.

The atheist group, acting as though it had uncovered some nefarious plot by Graham and his team, preened that it was "pleased that it was able to educate the school district about the true purpose of Samaritan's Purse — and that the district officials were quick to see the light."

"A lot of these groups rely on school authorities being ignorant about their mission," FFRF co-President Annie Laurie Gaylor said. "We appreciate how swiftly the district discontinued the fundraising after our alert."

But should the school have sidelined Operation Christmas Child?

HillFaith, a Christian website geared toward U.S. congressional staff, said Wednesday that it asked First Liberty Institute's Jeremy Dys if Liberty Middle School's involvement with Operation Christmas Child would have been protected by the First Amendment.

"The reality is that Samaritan's Purse is a social welfare organization. They exist to care for those in need — in the greatest of need across the world. Just because they are religious is no reason to exclude them from public," Dys told HillFaith.

"Excluding an organization just because it is religious is the the very type of religious intolerance the First Amendment abhors," Dys added. "FFRF and other Grinches would rather kids be denied the opportunity to care for kids who have nothing at Christmas than put up with the religious mission of Samaritan's Purse."